Book the best Tours of Bali

The far East has long attracted travelers to its shores with its mystique. A melting pot of cultures, visiting this part of the world offers a fascinating glimpse into the long, rich traditions of Asia. Aside from man-made wonders, South East Asia is blessed with natural beauty that continues to capture our imagination – be it clear blue seas or lush tropical rain-forests. With a bevy of destinations to choose from, this truly is a traveler’s dream.

FAQ & Expert Tips

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What are the best places to visit in Bali?

South Bali

One of the first areas of Bali to be developed for tourism was Kuta. The golden beaches, perfect waves and tropical charm of then undiscovered Bali attracted adventure seekers from all around the world. Today, Kuta is a bustling hub of shopping, dining, entertainment and has some of the island’s largest resorts tucked away in its winding streets. Famous for the raucous nightlife, Kuta is the place to be for some good old-fashioned partying.

Seminyak developed as an alternate to the already busy Kuta. For those looking for an upmarket experience by the beach with plenty of options for dining and entertainment, Seminyak is the place to be.

Next to Seminyak is the surf town of Canggu. Canggu is a coastal village and 10 km of beach. It lies approximately 10 kilometers north of Kuta, and presents a much more relaxing atmosphere of dining, cultural and beach activities. What it lacks in golden and white sand, it makes up for with perfect waves that are a surfer’s dream. Visit Canggu for beach clubs, hipster cafes and boutiques and small town vibe.

Sanur, on the South East coast of Bali, is one of the oldest resort towns in Bali. Sanur sees a more mature crowd, and is perfect for families looking for a beach getaway. Calmer and more easy going than its counterparts in the South West, Sanur offers golden beaches and calm waters perfect for swimmers. There are no dearth of cafes and restaurants and its little alleyways filled with rattan goods, beachwear, sarongs and more are a shopper’s paradise.

Nusa Dua and Jimbaran are great options for those looking for a quiet beach holiday. Even more laid back than Sanur, these erstwhile fishing villages are now home to several five star luxury resorts. While both are strategically located to reach the party hotspots of Kuta and Seminyak in thirty minutes, Jimbaran sill retains some of its original fishing village charm, while Nusa Dua is home to a burgeoning culinary and adventure sports scene.  

Central Bali

Ubud is the cultural and artistic heart of Bali. Home to centuries old traditions of woodcarving, silver works, painting and stone carving, the constant presence of ‘canang’ offerings, incense and ceremonies sets Ubud apart. Whether it’s locally run homestays or magnificent villas set in the rice fields, Ubud offers a range of accommodation options, all close to spas, world-class vegan and vegetarian restaurants and of course, the ubiquitous rice fields. Ubud is not much of a party town, and gets fairly quiet at night. However, it is the perfect base to explore the magic of Kintamani highland area. The famous Tegalalang rice terraces are less than an hour away, and the area is perfect to explore coffee, cacao and other fruit farms. Head up to Mount Batur for a sunrise trek to view majesty of the volcanoes up close, or explore one of the many temples sacred to the island’s Hindus.

Coastal Bali

East Bali is a largely under explored region and contains many hidden gems like the bat cave temple, water palace, white sand beaches and more. The real charm of East and West Bali lies in the many sleepy little villages, where you can experience a Bali far removed from the tourist circuit. The region is dotted with several luxury resorts, specially designed for those wanting to escape from city life. While the nightlife is not much to speak of, divers and snorkelers are in for a treat here. The spectacular diving spots span from Padang Bai to Amed and Menjangan in the west. 

How many days are needed to visit Bali?

We recommend a minimum of 7 days to experience the full magic of Bali. Bali is also great for a quick getaway but be wary of travel fatigue for travel times of over 4 or 5 hours. Bali is a fairly small island, but the sheer variety of sights and experiences makes it almost impossible to get a true sense of the island in a short time. Besides, once you are in Bali, you are on island time. It's a destination best enjoyed in a slow, relaxed pace.

What is the weather in Bali like?

Bali is one of those rare evergreen destinations. The high season, which sees the peak number of tourists arrive in Bali lasts from June to August.  The weather is hot and humid almost throughout the year, with the nights getting cooler in the dry period from May – September. The months of January and February see a lot of rain, but also have their own charm, with the island turning into a lush paradise. A week or two of torrential rain aside, the short bursts of rain in the wet season hardly deter tourists and locals alike from living their lives. Lightweight, breathable fabrics are best suited to the weather year round, and if travelling in the wet season, a rain jacket is recommended as well.

What is the best time to visit Bali?

The high season, which sees the peak number of tourists arrive in Bali lasts from June to August. We recommend coming to Bali in September or October, or alternatively, in March, April or May to make the most of good weather and relatively low tourist crowds.  

How to plan a trip to Bali?

The first step to plan a trip to Bali is to decide the time and duration of your trip. We recommend staying at least a week to soak in the various experiences. Personal travel is best done in a slow paced manner since it allows more flexibility to plan the trip according to the personal preference. For a group tour, a five or seven day itinerary such as this one works best. If taking the help of a local expert, your trip is likely to be more evenly paced since she/he would know the lay of the land already. If self guided, allow some time for meandering and getting lost along the way, and is best to avoid short trips.

How to travel to Bali?

Generally, tourists arrive at Ngurah Rai international airport. Most travel routes require a stop over at Kuala Lumpur, Singapore or Bangkok. There are several budget and full service airline options to consider. While budget airlines are, of course, easy on the pocket it may be an important consideration for many that meals, entertainment and check in baggage are usually not included in the price. For a flight of under 5 hours, this is generally not a great inconvenience for seasoned travellers. If travelling with family, senior citizens or infrequent travellers, it is recommended to opt for a full service airline. Some budget airlines that fly to Bali are Air Asia, Lion Air, Malindo, Scoot & Jetstar. Full service airlines to Bali include Malaysian airlines, Singapore airlines, Sri Lankan Airlines, Cathay Pacific & Emirates.  

Where to stay in Bali?

There are a number of options for accommodation in Bali. Seminyak developed as an alternate to the already busy Kuta. For those looking for an upmarket experience by the beach with plenty of options for dining and entertainment, Seminyak is the place to be. Next to Seminyak is the surf town of Canggu. Canggu is a coastal village and 10 km of beach. It lies approximately 10 kilometers north of Kuta, and presents a much more relaxing atmosphere of dining, cultural and beach activities. Calmer and more easy going than its counterparts in the South West, Sanur offers golden beaches and calm waters perfect for swimmers. Finally, whether it’s locally run homestays or magnificent villas set in the rice fields, Ubud offers a range of accommodation options, all close to spas, world-class vegan and vegetarian restaurants and of course, the ubiquitous rice fields. 

Wherever you choose to stay, there are a range of private villas offering privacy, resorts offering a range of amenities and home-stays with the local flavour available at all price ranges.

What is the best way to get around in Bali? How does public transportation in Bali work?

The fastest way to get around the island is undoubtedly on a motorbike. It provides the freedom to explore the narrow country roads, and Bali’s best treasures - the hidden waterfalls, canyons, temples and caves – are best discovered this way. However, this is only recommended for experienced riders with a valid international driving license. For those looking for some comfort and added safety, it is best to hire a car and driver for the day. This is a great to way to meet locals and gain some insight into Balinese culture and way of life. Unfortunately, there’s not much public transport to speak of. However, ride-sharing services like Grab Taxi can be used in some parts of the island using the app.

What are the daily expenses in Bali? What currency to carry?

The average traveller would spend money on accommodation, transport, meals & activities. The accommodation budget can be very flexible in Bali with options ranging from 20 USD a night to 200+ USD a night depending on the level of luxury you prefer, and whether you choose to stay in a hostel, home stay, resort or villa.

Transport costs depend on whether you opt for self-drive or guided tours. While self drives are more economical, they are more recommended for experienced travellers due to unpredictable road conditions. In addition, boat transfers to neighbouring islands can cost anywhere between 30 - 60 USD or more depending on how far you want to travel. 

You can expect to pay up to 7 USD for a meal with a drink. Specialty cuisines can cost up to 12 - 15 USD and local meals can cost as little as 2 - 5 USD. 

There is usually a small entrance fee of 2 - 5 USD to be paid at most popular attractions like waterfalls & temples that goes towards maintenance and supports the local community. If you opt for water sports or other adventurous activities, you can expect to pay up to 100 USD for 2 - 3 different activities. 

Remember to set aside a part of your budget for shopping - there are many beautiful handcrafted items like carvings, clothes, perfumes & more available for every budget at the traditional art markets.

What are the visa and insurance requirements for Bali?

Visa free entry is available to nationals of most countries, including India. Visa free entry is free, valid up to 30 days and available directly at the main immigration counter upon arrival at Ngurah Rai International Airport. Your passport will be stamped with the date of entry and you must leave before the 30th day from that date.

If you wish to stay in Indonesia for more than 30 days, you can obtain a Visa on Arrival card at the airport at a kiosk near the main immigration counters. It costs about 35 USD and can be paid in any major currency like USD, AUD and Euro. There are also ATM machines available near the immigration area where you can withdraw money in Indonesian Rupiah (IDR). This VOA card can be used to extend your visa at any immigration office in Bali. A visa agent can also help you with this process.

Travel insurance is not an official requirement for entry but is highly recommended for all travellers. Bali is safe and tranquil, but circumstances can change very quickly on a tropical island.

*Above information is for guidance purposes only. To find out if you need to obtain a visa, and if there are any specific requirements for your travel documents, please consult the respective Indonesian diplomatic/consular mission nearest to you. Alternatively, contact us and we can provide required guidance if you are planning to travel for tourism purposes.

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